Adam T. Bradley

Friday Readings

  • Providence Journal: Trump is shocked Carrier took him literally
    One of the best explanations of the Donald Trump 2016 phenomenon is this, via Salena Zito: The press takes him literally, but not seriously; his supporters take him seriously, but not literally.
  • Real-World Economics Review Blog: The slow, painful death of the TPP
    The basic point that everyone should know by now is that the TPP had little to do with trade. The United States already had trade deals with six of the 11 other countries in the pact. The trade barriers with the other five countries were already very low in most cases, so there was little room left for further trade liberalization in the TPP.
  • Annoyed Librarian: Children’s Librarians Corrupting the Youth The headline is, “The Very Hungry Caterpillar Lied to You As a Child,” because the editor doesn’t understand what the word “lie” means.
  • The Hard Times: Trump Appoints Your 8th Grade Bully Secretary of Defense
    “We’re not only going to make Mexico pay for the wall, they’ll also give America an extra $2 every day, so we can buy a pop.”

Friday Readings

Friday Readings

Friday Readings

Friday Readings

Friday Readings

Friday Readings

Friday Readings

  • Geopolitical Futures: Not Much Is New in This Election
    The question is not why Americans regard this particular election as apocalyptic. The question is why Americans routinely regard presidential elections as apocalyptic, without realizing they are simply acting out an old script. One reason is a general one. Americans do not remember the past very clearly, particularly when it doesn’t directly affect their lives. America was founded without a past, but with a breathtaking future. As a culture, our focus has been there. We get caught up in the moment and we lack a sense of perspective because our memory of the past has been rendered fuzzy, with the hard edges removed.
  • The Economist: The Economics of Donald Trump's Wall
  • Boston Review: Paying for Punishment
    But understanding decarceration only through the lens of cost cutting has a major blind spot. America’s contemporary system of policing, courts, imprisonment, and parole doesn’t just absorb money. It also makes money through asset forfeiture, lucrative public contracts from private service providers, and by directly extracting revenue and unpaid labor from populations of color and the poor.
  • Lukasz Olejnik: Battery Status readout as a privacy risk
    Privacy risks and threats arise and surface even in seemingly innocuous mechanisms. We have seen it before, and we will see it again.
  • The Economist: From Dotcom Hero to Zero
    At its peak in 2000, Yahoo had a market value of $128 billion. In the dotcom version of Monopoly, Yahoo got the prime slot.
  • Annoyed Librarian: Information Failure
    The time has long gone when people would settle bar bets by calling a reference librarian, but the same sort of fact-checking Snopes engages in is what reference librarians excel at, or at least used to until people stopped asking them reference questions and started asking them to clear the printer jams.
  • Kieran Healey: Olympics Trolling
    A moment’s thought suggests that my views are perfectly correct. Reflecting a little further on my sports bigotry, I think the simplest model is a two-dimensional space that, I think you will agree, is both easy to understand and wholly objective.
  • #fridayreads: The Collapse of Western Civilization: A View From the Future

Friday Readings

  • ABC (Australia): Crisis on high
    Deep in the Himalayas sits a remote research station that is tracking an alarming trend in climate change, with implications that could disrupt the lives of more than 1 billion people and pitch the most populated region of the world into chaos.
  • The Awl: How to read a book and walk at the same time
    whereas I found Wallace Stegner’s A Shooting Star tiresome and unfinishable when I was reading it at home, I found the eleven-and-three-eighth-ounce paperback tiresome but eminently finishable while walking. How does that work? Walking renders any book on hand finishable because your only alternative is your mind, and haven’t you had enough of that?
  • BBC News: Pets left hungry as smart feeder breaks
  • The Chronicle of Higher Education: Texas Picked an Ominous Date to Arm Its Public Colleges
    In what appears to be an audacious act of public forgetting, a controversial Texas campus-carry law allowing concealed guns in university buildings is scheduled to take effect on Monday, August 1, the 50th anniversary of the University of Texas tower shootings.
  • The Economist: How to make children do homework
    The parents of nearly 16,000 pupils at 36 secondary schools in England were sent regular text messages to remind them of forthcoming tests, to report whether homework was submitted on time and to outline what their children were learning. Parents could opt out if the texts became bothersome. Few did. The result was an uptick in performance in maths and (more weakly) English, as well as lower absenteeism.
  • Lars P. Syll: Cherry-picking Economic Models
    …if one extends the alcohol neutral model to take that role into account, it is optimal for humans to be drinking all of their waking hours.
  • The Age: Could an aspirin a day keep depression away?
    ASPREE involves 16,500 Australian volunteers, all aged over 70, plus a few thousand extra in the United States. It constitutes the largest clinical trial ever conducted in this country, and one of the largest in the world. Results will be available in 2018.
  • **Foreign Policy: Norway Is So Nice That It Wants to Give Finland a Mountain for Its Birthday “We want to reach out a hand to our neighbor that we will be able to shake across the summit.”
  • Columbia Journalism Review: Is Rolling Stone about to get throttled in court over UVA rape report?